"Frank's skill in asking the right questions is un-mistakable, and is at the core of his leadership philosophy.

The power of these questions cannot be underestimated, especially if you want to lead and not manage."
—John Cave
Westhaven Worldwide Logistics

If not otherwise stated—all postings © Frank D. Kanu. All rights reserved.

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Stop Telling... Start Leading!

Myers-Briggs Personality Type

Dominant Introverted Types

 1. Intuition INTJ & INFJ
 2. Sensing ISTJ & ISFJ
 3. Thinking INTP & ISTP
 4. Feeling INFP & ISFP

Dominant Extroverted Types

 1. Intuition ENTP & ENFP
 2. Sensing ESTP & ESFP
 3. Thinking ENTJ & ESTJ
 4. Feeling ENFJ & ESFJ


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Keirsey Temperament

Dominant Introverted Types

 1. Intuition Mastermind Rational (iNTj) & Counselor Idealist (iNFj)
 2. Sensing Inspector (iStJ) & Protector Guardian (iSfJ)
 3. Thinking Architect Rational (iNTp) & Crafter Artisan (iStP)
 4. Feeling Healer Idealist (iNFp) & Composer Artisan (iSfP)

Dominant Extroverted Types

 1. Intuition Inventor Rational (eNTp) & Champion Idealist (eNFp)
 2. Sensing Promoter Artisan (eStP) & Performer Artisan (eSfP)
 3. Thinking Field Marshal Rational (eNTj) & Supervisor (eStJ)
 4. Feeling Teacher Idealist (eNFj) & Provider Guardian (eSfJ)


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To Summarize:

When businesses increase in size, whether by geographical expansion, diversification, or vertical integration, it is essential that they place a strong emphasis on coordination. When there’s no coordination, workflow and productivity suffer. To be able to pursue the company vision, management must coordinate if it wants to plan out and distribute the resulting work meaningfully. The management functions as defined above.

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Manager = Entrepreneur?

Is a manager an entrepreneur?

Many entrepreneurs are managers, but fewer managers are entrepreneurs. One reason for this is that managers as a rule have no tangible stake in their business. A manager does not even have to own shares of the business in question. Interestingly, we all know people who are thought of as a good entrepreneur but a bad manager, but we don’t hear as often of people who are considered a good manager but a bad entrepreneur.

    Universities produce many MBAs. How many of them become successful entrepreneurs? True, they’ve learned the basics: accounting, controlling, marketing, and management. Those basics are important for entrepreneurs, too, but entrepreneurs have to bring way more to the table. In many ways the lot of the entrepreneur parallels that of the “struggling artist”.

    Entrepreneurs must be creative and innovative, but they also have to be inspirational. As long as managers do not see themselves also as entrepreneurs they will not develop their full potential. Going a step further, the responsibility of the manager is to train their team members to become managers themselves. The best performing teams are those where people see themselves as entrepreneurs within the team, not just worker bees.

Step back, relax, and look at the situation. Can you find your solution?

“Know Thyself”
Encryption over the main entrance of the Oracle of Delphi
    Although entrepreneurs and managers share many traits, they also have some notable differences. Entrepreneurs are known for taking risks and thinking primarily of the long term; managers are more detail-oriented and cautious, and they do care about the short term as well as the future. Entrepreneurs believe that failure in one venture is a learning experience that will give them more momentum next time; managers are much more fearful of failure and how it will affect their reputation.

    As the business world becomes more global (in part thanks to the Internet), the pressures and expectations on businesses grow. In this more competitive environment, businesses feel a need to make bolder, more long-ranging decisions. So, sometimes managers are forced to take the role of the entrepreneur.

What impact has modern society on entrepreneurship?

Can you define the entrepreneurial process?

What are the challenges an entrepreneur faces in your company; your line of business?

Do you see yourself as entrepreneur, manager or both?

    Viewing shareholder value as the business’s number one priority does little to encourage entrepreneurial spirit. Likewise, the many committees, boards, and regulations that come with them can squash entrepreneurship pretty easily. One of the hallmarks of successful entrepreneurship is the ability to make decisions quickly. Anything that hinders the ability to do that endangers the entrepreneurial spirit.

    Managers need to understand that adopting an entrepreneurial mindset alone isn’t what’s needed to make the business successful. What entrepreneurship can do is unlock the visionary ideas that can give the business a boost both short- and long-term. Don’t think of the entrepreneur as someone who creates chaos that managers need to fix. Think instead of that “chaos” as a vision—and use that vision to break out of the old ideas that keep the business from moving forward.

How long does it take to get a decision?

How many ideas get shut down?


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Are You Managed?

Let’s look at things from the point of view of an employee for a moment. (As a manager, this is directly relevant, since you’re an employee, too.) Think of the job interview. Traditionally, the employer asks questions and the prospective employee dutifully answers them. Even when they’re given the opportunity to ask their own questions, job-seekers seldom do. If you’re in this situation but you fail to ask questions, how can you really find out whether the company you may be working for is well-managed or chaotic? (The employer’s questions aren’t likely to give that information away.) Job seekers are trained and counseled to answer questions, but maybe it would be better if we encouraged them to ask questions and gave them some guidance on how to do it effectively. It might keep a lot of people from stepping into the “perfect job” that ultimately doesn’t turn out to be perfect at all!

“Good management is the art of making problems so interesting and their solutions so constructive that everyone wants to get to work and deal with them”.
Paul Hawken

Are the problems interesting or boring?

Who is in charge?

Are you managed by a woman or by a man?

Does it make a difference?

Should it?

    It is sad and shameful that in this day and age gender still plays a role in the business world. Words like “smart“, “creative“, “assertive“, and “talented” are neither female nor male. Yet it still happens too frequently that a woman reaches a certain rung on the management ladder but then goes no further. By keeping women from rising to their full potential, companies are eliminating half (perhaps more than half) of their talented managers suitable for the job.

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